The Falcon Flies!

After much delays the Falcon 9 has successfully reached low earth orbit!

It is funny though as a few days ago SpaceX seemed to discourage people being overly expectant of a success;

It’s important to note that since this is a test launch, our primary goal is to collect as much data as possible, with success being measured as a percentage of how many flight milestones we are able to complete in this first attempt. It would be a great day if we reach orbital velocity, but still a good day if the first stage functions correctly, even if the second stage malfunctions. It would be a bad day if something happens on the launch pad itself and we’re not able to gain any flight data.

If we have a bad day, it will be disappointing, but one launch does not make or break SpaceX as a company, nor commercial spaceflight as an industry. The Atlas rocket only succeeded on its 13th flight, and today it is the most reliable vehicle in the American fleet, with a record better than Shuttle.

I tried to confirm that statistic but according to me Atlas was successful on the fourth launch so I wasn’t sure what he was actually referring to. In any case Atlas is a bad example as the ones used now has nothing in common with the original SM-65 Atlas used for the Mercury missions. In fact the current Atlas V even has some Russian engines!

But, even though I’m not a fan of the COTS program, I’m still happy that this mission was a success. I’ll be looking out for Flight 2.

10213 Shuttle Adventure: Update

Full details are available now.

10213 Shuttle Adventure

Ages 16+
1,204 pieces
US $99.99 CA $129.99 UK £ 79.99 DE 89.99 €

Blast off on an outer space mission!

Standing 17.5″ (44cm) tall and 10″ (25.5cm) from wing tip to wing tip, this detailed and realistic space shuttle is ready to count down and blast off on its next exciting mission into space! You can take off from the launch pad, separate the detachable fuel tank and booster rockets, and deploy the satellite with unfolding antenna and solar cell panels. Shuttle model features realistic engines, retractable landing gear, an opening cockpit with seats for 2 astronauts, opening cargo compartment with a crane that can hold the satellite and a ground maintenance vehicle. Includes 3 minifigures: 1 male and 1 female astronaut, as well as 1 service crew member.

*Includes 3 minifigures: 1 male and 1 female astronaut as well as 1 service crew member!
*Features realistic engines, retractable landing gear, opening cockpit with seats for 2 astronauts and even a ground maintenance vehicle!
*Take off from the launch pad!
*Separate the detachable fuel tank and booster rockets!
*Deploy the satellite with unfolding antenna and solar cell panels!
*Open the cargo compartment to reveal the crane that can hold the satellite!
*Shuttle Adventure stands 17.5″ (44cm) tall and measures 10″ (25.5cm) from wing tip to wing tip!

If you want more there’s also a LEGO 10213 Shuttle Adventure video and loads of great discussion on Eurobricks.

New set; 10213 Space Shuttle!

It’s a dream come true! At last there’s a new LEGO Shuttle… and this one looks the best yet! I missed the others due to being in my “Dark Ages” and I’m not going to miss this one. A lot of the classic ones were too small, and the others were not designed for mini-figs. But supposedly this one is!

Sure some sizes are a bit wonky (the ET, External Tank, is too small for one) but it’s hard to do it perfectly at this scale. I love how they included the top level of the launcher platform; it’s the perfect way to display it. Any lacking in detail don’t really concern me; this has all the parts needed to build a shuttle at this scale (especially the ET) and anything extra would be fun to make yourself. I’d love to make satellites to scale! Those “fairings” at the rear wing root are wrong so I bet it has a working rear undercarriage there. I don’t like the red trans pieces on the rockets; the OMS (Orbital Maneuvering System) isn’t used at the same time as the SSMEs (Space Shuttle Main Engines) and…

…they burn almost clear. (The “waste” of the SSME is just water.) But that’s easily fixed too! This is the set of the year!

Space Update Episode 1: Mars Solar Shuttle!

Makes no sense eh? This is part one in a supposedly regular round-up session of space related news. First up is…

Mars

The Mars Society have done a good essay on what they see as the truth being President Obama’s future of NASA speech; in short that the US is going to cancel most manned programs and replace them with nothing. To my annoyance they seem to be one of the few that agree with me on this issue; most of the mainstream press are reporting his announcements as a good thing. Sadly it looks like in the short term the closest we’ll be getting to Mars is the Mars500 experiment. This experiment, while in many ways redundant, will provide some very useful data for when we at last get our priories right.

I’m starting to lose hope that I’ll see a new daring space mission in my lifetime.

Solar

Ikaros probe

Japan is launching a solar sailed test probe on May 18th known as IKAROS. It has a 20 meter (diagonal) sail and while this is mostly just a proof of concept they have plans to make a larger one with a 50 meter sail (as well as a solar powered ion engine) for a mission to Jupiter in the next ten years. Will solar racing be here soon?

X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle

X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle

Oh my, this one is exciting! Originally developed by NASA as part of Space Shuttle research prior to running out of money, this craft finished develpment under DARPA. I thought it was pretty much a dead project, but it’s actually in orbit right now! What it is actually doing is a mystery, but personally I don’t care that much. It’s just great news that there is some research going on in regard to re-usable space craft.

While the X-37 is small (about 25% the size of a shuttle) and unmanned, it still is an important craft. It’s designed to have much greater endurance than the shuttle too; up to 9 months! (Not needing oxygen or food obviously helps a lot, as does it’s usage of solar panels.) In the short term it’ll probably used for spying on foreign satellites, but think of the potential even as is; it could be modified into a rescue craft, a space tug, or even a sample mission to an asteroid!

On the other hand, this launch could be motivated by deep rooted resentment over the Dyna-Soar cancellation and this first launch may be the all they wanted…

COTS

Falcon 9 is still on the pad, with the launch being delayed until May 8. Hardly news…

Shuttle Birthday

Today (depending on perspective) is the anniversary of the completion of the first Space Shuttle launch, 29 years ago. Sadly this is the last one she’ll have as the last flight is planned for the September 16, this year. Aside from the massive loss of capability that the retirement will bring, this (combined with other cuts at NASA) will result in 10,000 jobs being lost. This works out as roughly of their staff. Will the grand plan of outsourcing work? Many doubt that it will.

As Larry Niven once said, “The dinosaurs became extinct because they didn’t have a space program. And if we become extinct because we don’t have a space program, it’ll serve us right!” yet here goes the USA going down that path in the name of budget cuts. Obviously they don’t agree with the sentiment.

Right now US Astronauts are doing great work in orbit; even the loss of their Ku band antenna didn’t stop them. They just docked without radar! Could a robot do this? No. Could a commercial company do this? It’s hard to be sure, but I doubt it.

Dreams of VASIMR

I was reading story about VASIMR and I was rather surprised by the quotes. In particular Franklin Chang-Diaz, who is credited as creating the VASIMR concept said;

They were mesmerized by the Apollo days and lived in the Apollo era for 40 years, and they just forgot developing something new

I think this statement is rather harsh, not to mention deceptive. Due to their low budget, NASA has been focused on Earth orbit missions ever since the 80s, and thus have been using more traditional booster methods, such as solid rockets and cryogenic rocket engine. There simply hasn’t been the money (or much reason) for research like this as by their own admission VASIMR is simply not suitable for these roles as it is designed for long term thrust in vacuum and its power to weigh ratio is too low.

I’m not really sure what game he’s playing there, but since he is CEO of the Ad Astra Rocket Company and all they do is develop the VASIMR, his motivations are suspect. Annoying several websites have published what reads like a PR release without much editing.

Personally I see this research as interesting and useful, but no where near as useful as a Space Shuttle replacement… something VASIMR will need to progress from an experiment to a practical technology. Research into technology like mass drivers, Scramjets and fusion power makes more sense.

The latest Buzz

Long time no post, I know. I’m still sorting stuff… but I should have a new MOC in the next week. On the subject of “Buzz”, he’s been blogging about how backward the NASA plans for the future are. I agree with him for the most part, but I can’t see it making much difference. Obama would have saved the Shuttle by now if he was interested in (and capable of) doing so. The word is that NASA will get an increase, but not enough for a new shuttle…